technology

BETTER BDR PLANNING IN FIVE STEPS

Multiple Wired to BackupIT systems have become increasingly critical to the business and protecting the data produced is more important than ever before. BDR (Backup Disaster Recovery) is the coordination and execution of company policy and technology architected to reduce downtime and expedite the recovery in the event of a disaster or hardware failure.

Ensuring critical data, systems and networks can be recovered in the event of acts of nature, like a flood, fire, or tornado can be a daunting task. What about if the power goes out for an extended period of time? Am I prepared for human error that leads to accidental deletion and data loss? Having a well thought out business continuity plan in place can ensure business objectives can still be achieved if an event happens.

Here are a few tips to get you started:

  1. Incorporate a solid plan. Better BDR planning takes into consideration the structural framework necessary to execute. This includes a thought out company policy that merges data retention requirements with the regulatory and compliance needs of the business. Conducting a risk assessment and/or a business impact analysis will lead to improved backup procedures and process.
  2. Fuse responsibility and accessibility. It’s imperative to identify critical IT resources and delegate ownership. In the event of an emergency, understanding the roles people play and the importance of systems and data used will be the first step in execution of BDR strategy.
  3. Audit, test and validate. Conducting regular reviews of each end point schedule, alert configuration and backup job could mean the difference between being proactive vs. reactive.
  4. Provide documentation. Keep all documents centralized. Items like backup process and schedule, off-site storage instructions, vendor contracts, training plans, etc. You will appreciate having all the pieces in one place when it comes time to assembling the puzzle. Following-up with a report that speaks to the frequency and maintenance of endpoint BDR can also be extremely impactful to management when justifying ROI.
  5. Get buy-in from management. This should go without saying but BDR planning requires money. No budget equals no plan. Failure to properly plan and obtain support from senior management will ultimately result in failed adoption. Of course trying to get funding from some management teams may be like trying to pull blood from a stone. But if all the elements are in place and your plan has taken into consideration the dollar amounts associated with the risks and threats of NOT adopting a BDR plan, this may prove more negotiable in the eyes of those responsible for keeping the lights on.

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